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Summary: A sermon answering a parishoner’s question regarding the "sin that leads to death".

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TOUGH QUESTIONS: BIBLE ANSWERS

Sin Will Kill You! Maybe?

I John 5:16-17

Tonight’s topic comes from a question concerning 1 John 5:16-17. What is sin that leads to death and what is sin that doesn’t lead to death. It is a question with an unclear answer because the writer doesn’t explain and the language doesn’t give us any definitive clues either. I will attempt to answer the question with the various possibilities and then we will look at the scope of the greater passage to see John’s overall points of emphasis.

Let’s look at each verse individually:

I John 5:16

If anyone sees his brother commit a sin that does not lead to death, he should pray and God will give him life. I refer to those whose sin does not lead to death. There is a sin that leads to death. I am not saying that he should pray about that.

• What kind of sin doesn’t lead to death? Satan told Adam and Eve that there actions wouldn’t lead to death…but we know the death was spiritual death. Is John only talking about sins that don’t lead to spiritual death? Maybe but let’s keep thinking.

• Prayer from someone other than the sinner could be offered up and life could be restored. Can we pray for other people’s sins to be forgiven?

• What kind of sin leads to death? Is it spiritual death, physical or both? It is possibly the blasphemy of the Holy Spirit. We’ll deal with that in a minute.

• Whatever sin it is, we are not to pray about that.

• What’s the cultural/spiritual climate of John’s day. The Zondervan commentary states:

o Judaism distinguished between deliberate sins--sins of open rebellion against God that were punishable by death--and inadvertent sins that can be atoned for (Lev 4; Nu 15:22, 29). First-century Judaism retained this pattern. In the Johannine community some such distinction was presumably made, hence the limitation "sin that leads to death."

o Basically, some sins were punishable by death still—those of willful disobedience. But others could be forgiven.

o In this instance of willful rebellion it would have been deemed to be of no use to pray for someone who had sinned in this way and was to be stoned.

o This brings us to the point of this first verse: Our prayers are meant to invoke the Holy Spirit’s convicting, correcting, comforting presence into the lives of God’s children. We are a community of faith. We are to care about our brothers and sisters. This is the height of intercessory prayer—praying for the lost and the backslider.

I John 5:17

“All wrongdoing is sin and there is a sin that does not lead to death.”

• John removes all wiggle room. Anything that is wrongdoing is sin and sin is the mark of separation from God.

• He says there is sin (not “a” sin) that does not lead to death. What is that? Again, he is not specific but the background would lead us to believe it to be sin that isn’t willful disobedience. We might know we’re committing sin but we don’t set out to sin and don’t outright refuse our God’s conviction.

What is blasphemy against the Holy Spirit? I believe it is refusing/rejecting the Person of the Trinity that is convicting us of sin and calling us to faith. If we refuse this movement of God it is impossible to forgive this sin of unbelief.


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