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Summary: The fourth phrase of the Creed: "Suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, dead, and buried"

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SUFFERED, DEAD, AND BURIED

TEXT: Matthew 27:27-31; Isaiah 53:1-9

So far in our look at the Apostle’s Creed, we have hit a lot of controversial lines. We have waded into the debates about God as “Father,” about the divinity of Jesus, and the Virgin Birth. This week, however, the phrase we are dealing with: “suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, dead, and buried” is simply a statement about what is almost universally considered to be historical fact. Part of the reason Pontius Pilate makes it into the Creed is to emphasize that we are talking about a historical event that can be located in time and place. These events didn’t just happen long ago in a galaxy far, far away. They happened in Palestine in the first century during the time when the Roman procurator, Pilate, was in office.

Under normal circumstances, the historical record would not need to be part of a creedal statement. You don’t have to have much faith for this line...you just have to look it up. But the line is included both because of a controversy at the time the Creed was written, and because of what follows.

We have already discussed the early Christian movement called Gnosticism. The Church later declared it to be a heresy, but in the early years of the Church, it was simply another branch of Christian faith. The Creed was written to give some definition to what it meant to be “Christian,” allowing the Church later to say this teaching is in or that teaching is out on the basis of the Creed that had been established. Whether that was helpful or not is another sermon, but for now it is important simply to realize that the Apostles’ Creed was written in response to need and controversy.

As I mentioned in the other sermon, the place where Gnosticism most ran afoul of Christian teaching was in its insistence that God could not really have become a human being in Jesus. They taught that the Holy Spirit filled Jesus at the time of his baptism and left before his shameful death. They believed that matter was essentially bad, so a God who is complete goodness could not possibly have, in any significant way, become human. Certainly God could not go through a birth canal or suffer the indignity of torture and physical death.

The phrase about Jesus’ conception and birth through a human woman is followed directly by this affirmation that the rest of the Christians did not agree with the Gnostics. Jesus was, as God, conceived and born and then he suffered, was crucified, dead, and buried...all of the things the Gnostics said were not possible.

In modern American culture, our problem with this line is a little different. Comfortable Americans are decidedly uncomfortable in the face of a suffering Christ. The account of what happened to Jesus in the last 18 hours or so of his life are not pleasant in the least. Much is being made about the graphic brutality with which those events are shown in Mel Gibson’s movie “The Passion.” It will be released in theaters this Wednesday, Ash Wednesday. That brutality is an accurate reflection of the events. It was a brutal time and crucifixion was so cruel and sadistic that it was forbidden for a Roman citizen to die that way. It was reserved for the barbarians and criminals who were not part of the empire.


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