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Summary: Everything about Jesus’ death was designed to bring Him suffering and shame. His enemies crucified Him between two thieves for the purpose of humiliating Him. They wanted to present Him as a common criminal dying with His kind. But, as usual, Jesus tur

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5-25-03

Title: The Face of Forgiveness: The Thief

Text: (Luke 23:39-43)

Scripture Reading: Luke 23:26-43

Introduction

Everything about Jesus’ death was designed to bring Him suffering and shame. His enemies crucified Him between two thieves for the purpose of humiliating Him. They wanted to present Him as a common criminal dying with His kind. But, as usual, Jesus turned the evil plans of His enemies into something good. The presence of these condemned men provided Him with an opportunity to demonstrate His grace and forgiveness.

Though the two thieves came to the cross from a common background, and had perhaps been companions in sin, they responded to their situation differently. While at first, both of them joined the crowd in ridiculing Jesus, one of them soon made a dramatic change in his attitude toward Jesus. The way that Jesus responded to the abuse being heaped upon Him convicted the thief. It convicted him of his own guilt and of Jesus’ innocence. The thief knew that he and his companion deserved death because of their guilt. He also knew that Jesus was innocent of the charges brought against Him. He could see that Jesus was different.

He was out of place hanging on that cross. The way that Jesus was praying probably made an impression too. He said, “Father, forgive them; for they know not what they do.” How could a man have such confidence in God in these circumstances? There was just something about the way He said the word “Father.”

And surely He must be different to have such an attitude of forgiveness toward those who were crucifying Him. All of these impressions led to the thief’s appeal.“Lord, remember me when You come into Your kingdom.” It was not a very strong appeal, but it was directed to the right person. Beneath this simple request was an unspoken plea for forgiveness. This very day this thief who was not fit to live on earth, according to the Roman government, went to be with the Lord. This man was a bad thief, not a good one, but because of his faith in the Son of God he became a saved thief. In mercy and love Jesus answered the thief’s request, “Assuredly, I say to you, today you will be with Me in Paradise.” Our Lord made this remarkable statement that the thief would be with Him in Paradise that very day.

Those two thieves had been arrested for the same crime, tried for the same crime, condemned for the same crime, and were dying for the same crime. What was the difference between them? There wasn’t any—both were thieves. The difference lies in the fact that one thief believed in Jesus Christ and the other didn’t.

This incident is a beautiful example of divine forgiveness. Forgiveness is the removal of our sins so they are no longer a factor in God’s dealings with us. We have no greater need than the assurance of God’s forgiveness. There are two words that can be used to describe the Lord’s forgiveness; full and free.

We will consider first the fullness of the divine forgiveness that is on display.


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