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Summary: The Messianic implications of Acts 2

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The Messianic implications of Psalm 2

Psalm 2:1-3, “2

1

Why do the nations rage?

Why do the people waste their time with futile plans?

2

The kings of the earth prepare for battle;

the rulers plot together

against the LORD

and against his anointed one.

3

"Let us break their chains," they cry,

"and free ourselves from this slavery."”

This Psalm usage in the New Testament is found in Acts 4:25, 26; 13:33, Hebrews 1:5, 6; 5:5; Revelation 2:26,27; 12:4; 19:15). This Psalm is considered a messianic Psalm. Its theme is God’s ultimate rule, a Psalm written to celebrate the coronation of an Israelite king, but also written for the coronation of Christ, the eternal King. This psalm by King David who was a shepherd, solider and king. We can see that he was also a Prophet (Acts 2:29,30)., because this psalm describes the rebellion of the nations and the coming of Christ to establish his eternal reign. David may have written these words during a conspiracy against Israel by some of the surrounding pagan nations. Chosen and anointed by God, David knew that God would fulfill his promise to bring the Messiah into the world through his bloodline (2 Sam 7:16; 1 Chronicles 17:11-12).

Verse 1 poses for us a rhetorical question, one that we don’t see until we read verse 2. Mankind is driven by many things most of which drive them away from God. We can walk down many roads in life towards many dreams and aspirations, but if our lives are not focused upon the meaning of Life, then we have lost the point and have no base for our lives. The point is that demonic hordes love to distract and distort truth as reality and falsehood into belief. Yet this cannot be since God Himself is truth, then Satan must be the liar in this equation, since God’s truth is all pervasive and truth. But this is the whole entire point. God will draw His enemies together to battle during Armageddon, and throw them into the Lake of fire, along with Satan, Antichrist and the False Prophet, the rest will be torn asunder unto the mighty Word of God. We fight against God when we as believers don’t love one another because while God is a God of holiness, He is still a God of love, wanting us as believers to love one another, thus fulfilling our obligation in this transaction of sorts, from death spiritually to life eternally. Christ is the one who holds the keys it is not us. The nations rage and go to war with each other, Jesus addressed this fact in his Olivet Discourse in Matthew 24-26. The whole point though is that while judgment may be coming, a person can avoid the judgment of hell by receiving the new life, that is found in receiving Jesus personally by faith in Him. Its not that we won’t have to face Him, because as we saw last time, each one us is headed towards some judgment, its just a matter of which judgment you are headed towards. Are you headed towards the judgment of what you’ve done with your faith in Messiah, or the judgment of eternal damnation? This battle that will occur during the Great Tribulation, the last three and one half years in the Tribulation, will happen. This in a sense in verse two gives us the first view of what this battle may look like. Although we know the nations will be gathered to fight and to die at the Word that will proceed from the Lord’s mouth, it is still important nonetheless to look forward and to press in towards the high calling that we have as believers in knowing God personally.


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