We've released a new version of SermonCentral! Read the release notes here.
Sermons

Summary: the one who comes to Me I will by no means cast out.

  Study Tools

This Ain’t the Ritz

Scripture: John 6:35–40, especially verse 37b: . . . the one who comes to Me I will by no means cast out.

Introduction: If we visited Paris and strolled like gaudy sightseers into the gilded lobby of the Ritz Hotel at the Place Vendôme, the concierge would look on us with disapproval. The hotel is exclusive, and we wouldn’t feel comfortable milling around in our tourist garb. I wonder if some people feel similarly uncomfortable coming to church—or coming to Christ? Does anyone feel unworthy of Christ, thinking their life is too soiled or their past too messed up? The Lord’s response: “The one who comes to Me I will by no means cast out.” The Greek phrase is emphatic: “I will absolutely never reject—cast out—the one who is coming to me.” This verse has comforted many people.

1. Personal Examples

A. While dying, Bishop Joseph Butler fell into uncertainty. A sense of his own sinfulness filled him with terrible concern. A friend, trying to comfort him, said, “You know, sir, that Jesus is a great Savior.” “Yes,” replied Butler, “I know He died to save. But how shall I know He died to save me?” “My lord,” said the friend, “it is written that him who cometh to Me I will in no wise cast out!” Butler’s eyes brightened. “I am surprised that, though I have read that scripture a thousand times, I never felt its virtue until this moment. Now I die happy.”

B. A man came to D. L. Moody, thinking his life was so messed up that not even God could help him. Moody quoted this verse: “Him that cometh to Me I will in no wise cast out.” The man had further objections, but was finally converted through this verse.

C. W. F. Thompson was converted by seeing this verse in a Gideon Bible while recovering from a gunshot wound. He later entered the ministry.

D. John Bunyan was poorly educated, the son of a tinker—a mender of pots and pans. He was godless and his language was vile. One day he overheard some women talking about the Lord. He was impressed by their words and demeanor, and he craved this kind of life; but, fearing he had committed the unpardonable sin, he sank into depression. One day he found John 6:37. That verse changed his life, and later, in Pilgrim’s Progress, he used it to point poor Pilgrim to Christ.

E. Charlotte Elliott of Brighton, England, was an embittered invalid. Hoping to help her, a Swiss minister, Dr. Cesar Malan, visited her. Over dinner, Charlotte lost her temper and railed against God. Her family left the room, and Dr. Malan, alone with her, stared at her across the table, saying, “You are tired of yourself, aren’t you?” “What is your cure?” asked Charlotte. “The faith you are trying to despise.” As they talked, Charlotte softened. “If I wanted to become a Christian and to share the peace and joy you possess,” she asked, “what would I do?” “You would give yourself to God just as you are now.” Charlotte did come just as she was. Her heart was changed that day. As time passed, she found and claimed John 6:37 as a special verse for her. Charlotte later wrote a poem which was sold across England in a leaflet that was headlined with John 6:37. Underneath was Charlotte’s poem, which became the famous invitational hymn: “Just As I Am.”


Browse All Media

Related Media


Foundational Truths
SermonCentral
PowerPoint Template
Symbol Of Baptism
SermonCentral
PowerPoint Template
Royal Family
SermonCentral
PowerPoint Template
Talk about it...

Nobody has commented yet. Be the first!

Join the discussion