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Summary: We don’t have any photographs of Jesus. That’s good and bad. But that doesn’t mean we don’t have any pictures. In fact, I would suggest that we have three portraits of Christ in the book of Revelations.

Dr. Roger W. Thomas, Preaching Minister

First Christian Church, Vandalia, MO

Three Portraits of Christ

Revelation 1 (quickview) , 5, 19

Introduction: We don’t have any photographs of Jesus. That’s good. If we did, we would probably turn them in to idols. Superstitious folk have enough trouble would outlines in tree bark and stains on subway walls in Chicago. Imagine what people would do with an actual photography.

On the other hand, without an actual picture of Jesus imaginations run wild. We tend to picture him as we want him to be. We end up with paintings of Jesus that look like white, Renaissance, Italian artists. Or worse yet, we conceive of a Jesus who is meek, mild, and weak. Our pictures leave nothing that would account for the fear and awe that friend and foe alike saw in the real Christ. The Jesus of our paintings is often a Christ that few of us, even Christians, take seriously.

We don’t have any photographs of Jesus. That’s good and bad. But that doesn’t mean we don’t have any pictures. In fact, I would suggest that we have three portraits of Christ in the book of Revelations. The last book of the Bible is named Revelation for a reason. It is the revelation of Jesus Christ. That phrase cuts two ways. It is a revelation from Christ. It is also a revelation of Christ.

The three portraits of Christ in Revelation come at the critical junctures in the book. The first (in chapter 1) outlines the one who speaks in the book. The second (in chapter 5) describes the one who holds the key to all that follows. The final portrait (chapter 19) is the grand finale. The Christ of the Second Coming is the one for whom all of history is waiting. Each is a detailed word picture complete with vivid symbols and graphic images. They don’t tell us what Christ looks like as much as who he is. That’s the picture that matters.

1. The Christ of the Church (Rev 1)

Read: Revelation 1:10-20 (quickview) 

Church, don’t forget this picture. Christ stands with his church. He is in the midst of her. He holds her angels in his hands. Her future, her power, her hope rest in him and him alone. When the church is in his hands, it is in good hands.

2. The Christ of the Future (Rev 5)

In chapter four, John gets a glimpse of heaven. He sees the glory and power of the one who sits on the throne. He is awed by the scene. He is also troubled. He sees in the right hand of God a scroll. He knows the scroll contains the will and plan of God for his people. On it are written the future of planet Earth. John so desperately wants to know what it says. It is not so much the future he wants to know as God’s will. That ought to be every saint’s desire. Who cares what the future brings as long as we in God’s will when it comes?

But there’s a problem. The scroll is sealed. No one can open it. Then a cry goes up from the courts of heaven. The scroll of the future can be opened. There is one who is worthy to unlock its secrets—only one! Here’s the portrait that follows.

Read: Revelation 5:1-14 (quickview) 

The song says it well. “I don’t know what tomorrow holds, but I know who holds tomorrow.” The Christ lamb who was slain and lives holds the future in his hands. What ever happens, we are in good hands when we are in his.


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