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Summary: The resurrection of Jesus is the promise that we shall not be forgotten.

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Why Seek the Living Among the Dead?

Luke 24:1-11

A Sermon for Easter Sunrise Service at Tasso UMC cemetery, 2014.

We are gathered here in the church cemetery where we bury our dead as our ancestors before us have for over 150 years. We come by from time to time to remember them by visiting their graves and placing flowers and other mementos there. In the more than twenty-five years I have been associated with this cemetery, many people I have known have been buried here. From reading the tombstones and reading the history of our church, I can piece out the stories of others here. But many of these stones are so old that their story is being eroded by time. Other graves are unmarked. Many of those who have recently been buried here will soon join them in obscurity, known but to God

I can remember when I was on a tour through what had recently been East Germany in 1999. Much of the area was terribly impoverished. I can remember seeing the crumbling apartment complexes, all in dull grey without shutters or anything which would make it look inviting. They looked like grey tombs for people without names. But I also noticed something startling in their cemeteries. The stones were of finely polished granite with gilded inlaid letters. In East German terms, these stones cost a small fortunes. The rocks cried out “Remember Me!” These people who had no name in life were so desperate to be remembered that they probably saved what little money they had made in life for these gorgeous stones. As granite is slow to weather and gold does not tarnish, they hope to be remembered for the ages to come.

We know in the land of the living the desperation of people to be known. Some of the most terrible acts of violence have been done by people who were so desperate for their fifteen minutes in the world’s setting sun that they would resort to anything to get attention. For since we are all fixated on the bad things people do, these people resort to carnage so that they can make the nightly news for a few days while the rest of the world ponders why. This horrible sickness of anonymity is the curse of the fallen world. Surely there is a better way to be remembered.

When we look at this morning’s text, it appeared to the world that Jesus’ fifteen minutes of fame was over, ending with a spectacularly gory death on a cross. He was dead and buried as far as the world was concerned. His crestfallen disciples would lament His death for a while as they returned home to their previous occupations. His enemies then and now hope that all remembrance of Him will disappear from the pages of history, eroded away by the processes of time and silence, just a tombstone in history without a name.

The group of women who came to the tomb of Jesus did not expect to find a living Jesus. They were doing just as we do at funerals. They were coming to perform the proper act of remembrance for the dead. They were especially saddened by the means that Jesus had died just as we are troubled by those who have been murdered. They brought spices to anoint the body, perhaps not knowing that Joseph of Arimathea and Nicodemus had already done this. They weren’t coming with joy but extreme sorrow. They weren’t thinking about how to roll away the stone to let the living Jesus out but rather to let them in to anoint the corpse of Jesus.


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