We've released a new version of SermonCentral! Read the release notes here.
Text Illustrations
Robert Robinson had been saved out of a tempestuous life of sin through George Whitfield’s ministry in England. Shortly after that, at the age of twenty-three, Robinson wrote the hymn Come, Thou Fount.


Come, Thou Fount of ev’ry blessing,


Streams of mercy, never ceasing,


Call for songs of loudest praise.


Sadly, Robinson wandered far from those streams and, like the Prodigal Son, journeyed into the distant country of carnality. Until one day—he was traveling by stagecoach and sitting beside a young woman engrossed in her book. She ran across a verse she thought was beautiful and asked him what he thought of it.


Prone to wander— Lord, I feel it—


Prone to leave the God I love.


Bursting into tears, Robinson said, "Madam, I am the poor unhappy man who wrote that hymn many years ago, and I would give a thousand worlds, if I had them, to enjoy the feelings I had then." Although greatly surprised, she reassured him that the "streams of mercy" mentioned in his song still flowed. Mr. Robinson was deeply touched. Turning his "wandering heart" to the Lord, he was restored to full fellowship.


—Kenneth W. Osbeck, 101 Hymn Stories, p. 52

Related Text Illustrations

Related Sermons

Browse All Media

Related Media


Fasting And Prayer
SermonCentral
PowerPoint Template
Holy Living
SermonCentral
PowerPoint Template