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Summary:

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Introductory Considerations

1. The land was theirs. God’s promise to Abraham and the people of Israel had been fulfilled. The kingdom had been established and David had been anointed King of Israel. After reigning for 7 years in Hebron, David captured Jerusalem and made it the capital. The ark of God was brought to Jerusalem as a sign, not only of God’s presence but that David’s rule and God’s rule were directly related, and God had given David rest from His enemies.

2. Just like after World War 2 in Europe, it was the time of new beginning. Governments had to be re-established and a foundation laid for how things would run.

3. And so David proposes to build a temple, a dwelling place, a house for God. It seemed like a good thing to do, even Nathan the prophet gave his blessing. But he had forgot to ask God so God comes to Nathan and tells him what to tell David.

4. It is in the words of God, in His response to David, that God re-establishes His covenant and clarifies the type of relationship that He will have not only with David, but with His descendants and with His people.

5. As we look at God’s covenant we see how amazing God’s word really is, for He teaches David the terms, the principles of the relationship and we can apply them to us today.

6. He also makes promise that were fulfilled in part in the OT reign of Israel, further fulfilled in the NT and are being fulfilled even today until they are completed. God’s promises are so great that He allows their fulfilment to unfold in part, like a flower slowly opening up.

7. By seeing in part the beauty of God’s ways, we realize our role in His work and how wonderful and faithful He really is.

8. Lets begin with God and David

Teaching

1. As we said David wanted to build a house for God. After all, David had a palace, should Israel’s heavenly king not have one as well. All the others nations around them had build temples for their kings.

2. But God know there is a danger in this. It is not for man, not even for David to determine where God will make His presence and how He will rule.

3. And so God challenges David’s plans. "Who decided that you are the one to build me a house? I have not had a house in the past, I have been content to move around in a tent as my dwelling place. Who says that I now want a permanent dwelling place? Have I asked anyone to ever build me one? Did I ask Moses, or Joshua or any of their other leaders? David, this is your idea not mine. You may be the King but I am God and I am the one in charge. I am the one who took you from being a shepherd and made you king. I am the one who has provided for you and for the people and I will continue to do so. I will give you rest from your enemies.

4. God tells us here that He is the one who provides for us, not us for Him. He will determine our relationship with Him not us. He will not be boxed into the temple or building of our choosing.

5. We will serve Him but our service is not to be of our scheming but of His desire for us.

6. God promises what he will do. "I will establish a house for you." God does not mean that He will build a dwelling place but rather when He says "house" he means a "Dynasty", a "kingdom". God will establish a kingdom for David and His ancestors. He will provide offspring from David’s own body who will establish His kingdom. And He will build a house for His Name.


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Sidney Harper

commented on Oct 21, 2006

I really found this teaching clear and very refreshing, to better understand the promises of God before the first coming of Jesus. Sidney

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