Sermons

Summary: To establish that on the first day of the week; the church congregated; observed the communion and contributed of their means, to the Lord. This is a day of fellowship, preaching, breaking of bread, songs, and, prayers. This lesson establishes the regularity of the Lord’s Supper, in worship.

INTRODUCTION

Outline.

2. The Day of their Communion

Remarks.

1. This is the second lesson in this sermon-series: “The First Day of the Week.” In it, we will discuss the church's coming together on the “first day of the week,” to observe the communion (the Lord’s Supper). Luke wrote: “And upon the first day of the week, when the disciples came together to break bread, Paul preached unto them, ready to depart on the morrow; and continued his speech until midnight,” Acts 20:7.

2. The apostle was passing through Troas, enroute to the city of Jerusalem. He abode there for seven days. It was the practice of the early church; to observe the communion, the Lord’s Supper upon: "the first day of the week." The apostles directed a weekly celebration, of this memorial. With this introduction, let's consider lesson 2, “The Day of their Communion,” in this sermon-series.

BODY OF LESSON

II THE DAY OF THEIR COMMUNION

A. The day of communion is on "the first day of the week." Luke wrote: “And upon the first day of the week, when the disciples came together to break bread, Paul preached unto them, ready to depart on the morrow; and continued his speech until midnight,” Acts 20:7. Observe--

1. First, the apostle was passing through Troas, enroute to the city of Jerusalem. He abode there seven days; waiting for the “first day of the week.”

2. Further, Paul waited to assemble himself with the church for worship, communion, and to preach Christ unto them: "upon the first day of the week." I should note that Paul preached until midnight, ready to depart on the morrow (the next day). I wonder if this is even possible today.

NOTE: Illustrate, I had an invite one Lord's day; to speak at a local congregation in the evening service. I consented, and once there, in my opening comments, I stated: I propose to be like Paul, "to preach till midnight." One of the elders shouted out: "You'll be the only one here." And the church laughed. I smiled politely, and began the lesson with intention, to speak briefly during this invitation.

3. Finally, it was the practice of the early church to observe the communion upon the: “first day of the week.” May I suggest to you that every week has a "first day?" Let’s consider the purpose and blessings of the Lord’s Supper.

B. Communion is a memorial. It celebrates the resurrection of Christ. Paul wrote regarding the communion service to the Corinthians: “For I had received of the Lord that which also I delivered unto you, That the Lord Jesus the same night in which he was betrayed took bread: And when he had given thanks, he brake it, and said, Take, eat: this is my body, which is broken for you: this do in remembrance of me. After the same manner also he took the cup, when he had supped, saying: This cup is the new testament in my blood: this, do you, as oft as ye drink it, in remembrance of me. For as often as ye eat this bread, and drink this cup, ye do shew the Lord's death till he comes. Wherefore whosoever shall eat this bread, and drink this cup of the Lord, unworthily, shall be guilty of the body and blood of the Lord. But let a man examine himself, and so let him eat of that bread, and drink of that cup. For he that eateth and drinketh unworthily, eateth and drinketh damnation to himself, not discerning the Lord's body. For this cause, many are weak and sickly among you, and many sleep,” 1 Corinthians 11:23-30. Observe--

1. First, the Lord’s Supper looks backward: “This due ye as oft as ye: eat this bread, and drink of this cup, ye do it, in remembrance of me,” 1 Corinthians 11:23-25.

a. Communion remembers the Lord's death, burial, and resurrection. It recalls the Lord Himself; instituted this solemn feast, at His table, Matthew 26:26-30.

b. When we eat the bread; and drink the cup, we do it "in remembrance of Christ."

c. We eat and drink with the Lord, remembering His suffering, death, and shed blood, for our sins, Matthew 26:28. And for the church, Acts 20:28.

d. It is truly an honor and privilege, to partake of His table on: “the first day of the week,” Acts 20:7; 1 Corinthians 10:16; 1 Corinthians 10:21.

2. Further, the Lord’s Supper looks outward: “Ye do shew (proclaim or declare) the Lord's death,” 1 Corinthians 11:26a. We do it to proclaim the Lord’s death for our sins, and for the entire world, 1 John 2:1-2. The communion tells the world why we break the bread and drink the cup of the Lord. It is observed, in remembrance. It is done: in thanksgiving. We keep it to proclaim: "That God hath commended His love towards us, while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us,” Romans 5:8-11; John 3:16; 2 Corinthians 5:14-15.

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