Improve your sermon prep with our brand new study tools! Learn all about them here.
Sermons

Summary: It is vitally important that in our dark times, we cast our cares on God. As Peter says, He cares for you.

  Study Tools

The shadow of betrayal

Psalm 55

The psalm is a maskil. Ultimately, we don’t know what a maskil is. The best idea we have is that the word maskil is associated with the word "wise" or "skilled." In the times of the ancient Hebrews, wisdom could apply to anything. You could cook wisely (some might still say that is the case). You could play a harp wisely. It meant was that you were good at your craft. Since David gave the first two books of psalms to the priests to be used in worship, I tend to think that this subtitle was added by the priests. It was an instruction for a priest that wanted to assign this psalm to a singer or harpist. They had to be good.

This psalm is focused inward. David is pleading for relief. He is so distressed that it is affecting him physically. He is restless. Some translations say he is moaning. His distress is so deep it affects him like grief. I picture a man so upset that he is pacing and if not weeping, groaning meaningless noises.

• Has someone died? No.

• Has his nation suffered disaster? No.

• Has a family member been harmed? No.

He has an enemy, and his enemy has done him deep damage. The damage he has done is not physical. His enemy has done something that can inflict far more damage than any violence:

• He has spoken hatefully

• He has looked with anger

The degree to which this enemy’s anger and contempt has been expressed has done something we would never expect. It has made David afraid.

David!

• Saul has killed his thousands, David his ten thousands

• The man who killed a hundred men to pay his bride price

• The boy who was man enough to face down Goliath

David is afraid. He is terrified. He is afraid for his life. David’s life has been in danger many times, but this time, the fear is so deep that it has led him to desire something no warrior like David would easily admit. He would like to run away.

How many of us have not felt like David?

• If I was only a bird, I would fly away from this person and never come back

• I would go somewhere he would never find me

• I would fly out to the loneliest place I could reach, someplace I could hide and be safe

I would flee far away and stay in the desert

Think about that. The desert is not a place to be trifled with. I remember being in the desert with a guy who was taking me to homes to talk to some of the people there. I guess we did not go far. I did not pay attention.

• There are no landmarks

• There is no water

• There is no road

• There is only sun and sand

When we were done, I asked him where I was going. He said, "over there." It was high noon, so I didn’t even know which direction he was pointing. I didn’t know how many dunes I would cross before I saw a building I recognized.

He knew where he was, but I had no idea how far "over there" was or if I could find my way home. I wasn’t about to take chances asked him to take me.

Of course, David knew some of the tricks and how to find shelter, having run from Saul for many years. So he is saying, I would rather face the desolation of the wilderness and live off the land than face this enemy.


Browse All Media

Related Media


Betrayal
SermonCentral
PowerPoint Template
Light Shines
Journey Box Media
Video Illustration
Talk about it...

Nobody has commented yet. Be the first!

Join the discussion