Sermons

Summary: Though the Writings span a great deal of time, they do point us to Christ.

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Job 19:25-27

Psalm 22:1-8; 16b-18

Intro.: Over the years I have dabbled in poetry.

1. In the fall of 1997 I was driving back from church. As I drove along, a leaf crossed my path. It looked as if it were a small animal creeping along the ground. A couple of days later I wrote the following:

The Leaf

Today a leaf danced across my path.

It did a little jig as it moved upon the ground,

urged along by unseen hands.

Dry and tender, it waltzed in step with the trees

who clapped their hands to the tune of some

silent melody.

I moved on, perhaps never again to see that sight,

though leaves will dance and waltz tomorrow. (i)

2. I can appreciate the dilemma that a writer faces – between writing a simple statement and then communicating what is coming from the heart.

3. Over the past two weeks, we have looked at the picture of the Messiah in the Law and the historical books of the Old Testament

4. Today we turn to those books that are grouped together under the title "The Writings".

Pray

Trans: The writing cover a broad period of time.

1.Job is considered one of the earliest pieces of writing

2.Though David is writing most of the Psalms in about 1000 BC, some of the Psalms date three or four hundred years later. Some would date them several hundred years earlier.

3.But regardless of when they are writing, the authors of these books, kept their eyes on God

T.S. This morning, I would like to look at two passages from the writings that focus our attention on the coming Christ.

I. Job shows a man of great faith in the midst of great trouble.

A. The author of the Word Biblical Commentary on Job that he makes no pretensions to understand what the book of Job is all about. Even given unlimited time – it would be an impossible task.ii

B. Here is a man who lost it all. He lost his health, he lost his wealth, and he lost his family – he had nothing.

C. Even his friends seem to betray him – even seeking to get him to curse God.

D. I would not want to be Job.

E. Yet in the midst of all of his problems, Job keeps his faith. Not just once or twice or three times, but four times Job testifies to God’s goodness even in the midst of crisis.

F. Turn with me to Job 19:25-27. We are at the end of Job’s story – yet he continues to praise God.

G. Job know that a redeemer is available. Various translators have chosen different words to describe the word "redeemer" – defender, champion, but the vast majority of translators use the word with which we are familiar – "redeemer."

(Ill.) Those of you who went through the book of Ruth with me in Bible Study have seen this word before. It is the same word used to describe Boaz’s responsibility to Ruth – where he is called the "kinsman redeemer". Just as Boaz offers to let Ruth join his family after his cousin, her husband, dies, Christ invites us to join his family.

H. And Job knows that he, in spite of his miserable circumstances, is a part of the family of God.

(Ill.) "I’m so glad I’m a part of the family of God" – a Bill Gaither song actually had its roots in a similar circumstance in their church in Anderson, IN. They heard of a young man in the community who had been severely burned when an explosion demolished the garage where he worked. Doctors did not expect him to live through the night.


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